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Putting the last mile first

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+) demands Universal Health Coverage that:

  1. Puts the last mile first – placing the needs of the poorest and most marginalised members of society at the start and centre, and transforming ‘leave no one behind’ from rhetoric to reality.
  2. Builds comprehensive, people-centred and community-led and based systems for health – moving beyond narrow ‘health systems’ to a holistic approach that maximises and resources the unique role, reach and impact of community responses.
  3. Embodies rights and equity – with legal and policy frameworks that address the full range of, and barriers to, social determinants of health, especially for key and affected communities.
  4. Puts key and affected communities in the driving seat – listening to their needs, respecting their experience, and providing concrete opportunities to shape plans, packages and fiscal mechanisms.

UNITAID Communities Delegation Handbook

UNITAID is an innovative global health initiative that uses its long-term sustainable funding to support projects that positively impact the market for medicines, diagnostics and other health products for HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria.

This handbook describes the mission and vision of the delegation and the Terms of Reference of the different delegation members.

Appeal to Global Fund on Funding in the Caribbean!

The Board of the Global Fund is considering a policy that will cause the Global Fund to transition out from some countries in the CARICOM region and other Upper Middle Income Countries. Together with the Caribbean Regional Network we appeal to the Global Fund to preserve their financing. With high HIV prevalence and significant gaps in access to prevention, treatment, care and support, especially for key population living with HIV, cutting financing risks severely undermining the gains made in the HIV response.

The letter below was today delivered to the Global Fund Board.

Summary Demands High Level Meeting 2016

The United Nations will gather for the High Level Meeting on HIV on 8-10 June 2016. Many say this may be the last High Level Meeting on HIV ever. This also depends on whether member states dare to give the HIV response teeth with greater political commitments to fight stigma and discrimination, protect human rights and fundamental freedoms and ensure universal access to treatment, care and support for all people living with HIV.

This is our chance to move members states to come to an unequivocal agreement with clear, time bound targets that ensure the rights and protection of people living with HIV and key populations.

A ‘Zero Draft’ of the political declaration, developed by co-facilitators Switzerland and Zambia was just released. This key document lays the foundation of the negotiations towards the High Level Meeting this upcoming June.

This summary contains the key messages and principles we demand from our national delegates.

Sign-on letter: Civil Society Organisations Call on the Prime Minister of Mauritius to stop the deportation of a student living with HIV from Mauritius

The AIDS and Rights Alliance for Southern Africa (ARASA), Prévention Information Lutte contre le Sida (PILS) and the undersigned civil society organisations call on the Prime Minister of Mauritius to stop the deportation of a young woman from Cameroon solely on the basis of her HIV status. We urge policy makers in Mauritius to review and amend the Immigration Act which specifies that persons afflicted with any infectious disease are prohibited from entering the country.

As part of her study permit application, the female student was tested for HIV upon arrival in Mauritius. After testing positive for HIV, she received a notification letter from the Passport and Immigration Office informing her that the application for her study visa had been denied and that she would be deported from the country.
The determination that the student be deported on the basis that her HIV status is a contagious infection, as provided for in the Immigration Act, is discriminatory. Scientific and medical developments in the last three decades have proven that effective HIV treatment has significantly reduced AIDS-related deaths and has transformed HIV infection from a condition that inevitably resulted in early death to a chronic manageable condition.

It is well accepted that states may not discriminate against people living with HIV or members of groups perceived to be at higher risk of HIV infection on the basis of their actual or presumed HIV status. International human rights law guarantees the rights to equal protection before the law and freedom from discrimination on any ground. The rights to equality and non-discrimination in the context of HIV has in addition been interpreted as imposing an obligation on states to review and repeal any laws, policies and practices to exclude treatment based on arbitrary HIV-related measures. The provisions of the Immigration Act which permit deportation on the basis of HIV status are discriminatory and there is no evidence that laws of this nature protect public health.

The deportation of this student on the basis of her HIV status only is not only contrary to fundamental international human rights, but will undoubtedly fuel the already high rates of stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV in Mauritius. All persons have the right to education and this right extends to people living with HIV. States should ensure that people living with HIV are not discriminatorily denied access to education, including access to schools, universities, scholarships and international education or subject to restrictions solely based on their HIV status.

We appeal to the Mauritian government to make progressive efforts to increase awareness and education on HIV, law and human rights for the general public, government agencies, services providers within key sectors and law enforcement officials. Comprehensive anti-discrimination law that protects people against discrimination on the basis of real or perceived HIV status should be adopted.

VCT@WORK Operational Guidelines

Respecting human rights in the implementation of the VCT@WORK initiative: Operational guidelines

Access to VCT is part of a comprehensive workplace response to HIV. The VCT@WORK initiative seeks to address the needs of large and small businesses, as well as workers in the informal economy. These operational guidelines provide guidance on respecting human rights in the implementation of the VCT@WORK initiative, with a particular focus on the following.

  • consent
  • confidentiality
  • counselling
  • connection to care
  • gender equality and women’s empowerment
  • meaningful engagement of people living with HIV
  • inclusion of key populations

In all workplace settings, staff HIV awareness is crucial to reducing HIV stigmatization and discrimination. Information should be made available to ensure that all workers know where they can go to seek voluntary and confidential HIV testing, and how to access HIV prevention, treatment, and care and support services.

A workplace policy with clearly defined principles to protect the rights of workers and to ensure non-discrimination and gender equality, as described in ILO Recommendation No. 200, is essential for the implementation and success of the VCT@WORK initiative. Of equal importance is the need for a truly representative HIV workplace committee, which should serve as a mechanism for the development and review of the workplace policy and programmes – including the VCT@WORK initiative.

The principle of Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV (GIPA) is central to the implementation of the VCT@WORK initiative. A growing body of evidence shows that programmes implementing GIPA achieve better, and more sustainable, results. Globally, organizations such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria continue to invest in the involvement of people living with HIV at all levels. At the local level, GIPA facilitates the creation of an environment that enables people living with HIV to fulfil their potential as employees, leaders and active members of society; it reduces stigma and contributes to the elimination of judgmental attitudes and discrimination. The guidelines further reinforce the need to:

a. build strong partnerships between workplaces involved in the initiative and employers’ and workers’ organizations, PLHIV networks and national governments, and, in particular, national AIDS commissions and VCT service providers;

b. provide adequate infrastructure and facilities for VCT to be conducted with respect for confidentiality and privacy, and aligned principles; and

c. establish good referral links with other service providers, to ensure that the needs of all PLHIV (women, men and transgender people) working with an organization are met.

The operational guidelines were developed following data collection from three country-level consultations with networks of PLHIV in India, Nigeria and South Africa – the three countries in the world with the highest numbers of people living with HIV. The inclusion of policy makers and decision makers from the business community in country-level discussions allowed them to express their concerns with regard to the implementation of HIV testing in and through the workplace.

 

 

Community Guide to the WHO Guidelines

GNP+ is  proud to present Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

Community guide copy

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed this Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

The guide is designed to be updated regularly, and extra modules will be added as further guidelines are issued by WHO, such as those on key populations and adolescents.

 

You can download the modules here.

Download here:

“Whoever designed the guide deserves a round of applause because it is really great and we will be putting it to use right away. The question is how can we use this simplification as a model for getting information such as this to the commmunity.”

Dr Rose Wafula, PMTCT co-ordinator at NASCOP (National AIDS and STI Control Program) Kenya

Community Guide Module G: Policies

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module F: Programmes

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module E: ART for Children

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module D: ART for Pregnant Women

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module C: ART for adults

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module B: Using ARVs to prevent HIV

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

Community Guide Module A: HIV diagnosis

This set of modules is designed to be used by communities to support the use of the new resource, Driving the HIV response: A community guide to the WHO 2013 Consolidated Guidelines on the Use of Antiretroviral Drugs for Treating and Preventing HIV Infection.

The downloadable modules cover different topics, and include:

The Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance and STOP AIDS NOW! developed the Community Guide in response to the World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV. It aims to assist community leaders and civil society organisations to:

  • better understand the new WHO recommendations and guide country-level discussions on priorities (within civil society and between civil society and government)
  • ensure the meaningful participation of communities most affected by HIV in national decision-making and planning
  • advocate for any changes or further research necessary to adapt recommendations to suit their country context
  • mobilise and prepare communities for the implementation of new recommendations.

GIPA Report Card Information Sheet

The GIPA Report Card is a means of generating evidence about the application of the GIPA principle in-country based on the views and experiences of people living with HIV. The evidence will contribute to monitoring and evaluating governments’ and organisations’ application of the GIPA principle, particularly in light of the 2001 United Nations General Assembly’s Special Session on HIV and the Declaration of Commitment.

The GIPA Report Card is an advocacy tool, which aims to increase and improve the programmatic, policy and funding actions taken to realise the greater involvement of people living with HIV in a country’s HIV response.

Available in English and French

For more information on the the specifics of the GIPA Report Card or on countries that have applied the GIPA principle, click here

Policy framework to implement Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention

Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention highlights the importance of placing the person living with HIV at the centre of managing their health and wellbeing. As a step towards operationalising Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention, GNP+ and UNAIDS have developed Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention: A Policy Framework (January 2011). The Policy Framework provides the broad concepts that represent the first steps towards operationalising Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention.

The Policy Framework informs the development and implementation of operational guidelines that reflect linkages between a wide range of policies and programmes aimed at supporting and improving the health, dignity and prevention needs of people living with HIV. The Policy Framework has been developed through intense consultation with networks of people living with HIV, civil society, governments, UN cosponsors and donors globally.

Making the law work for the HIV response

The present document is a compilation of some of the laws that can help create a legal environment which enables universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support (i.e protective laws) or that can block such access for people living with HIV, sex workers and their clients, men who have sex with men and people who use drugs (i.e. punitive laws). Corrections to the information herein are welcome and will be reflected in any future update of this document.

Available in English and French.

For more specific information on HIV and the law, go to the crminalisation scan website

LIVING2008 Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights Working Group Statement

With treatment and care becoming increasingly available, PLHIV are regaining their health, living longer, fulfilling lives, and planning for their futures. This includes decisions about sex, sexuality and the possibility of starting or expanding families. Despite this, there still prevails an underlying assumption that one’s sexual and reproductive life stops when one becomes HIV positive. Often society at large, health care workers, decision makers and even PLHIV themselves hold this assumption.
For a person living with HIV, dealing with sex means dealing with difficult issues at vulnerable moments and in vulnerable settings. Often people living with HIV are expected to disclose their HIV status before engaging in sexual relations – in some countries it is even a legal obligation, even though this may lead to (gender-based) violence. People living with HIV are expected to initiate and engage in safe sex strategies to prevent the transmission of STIs or transmitting HIV to one’s sexual partner(s). With regards to family planning, people need to be able to make well- informed decisions around conceiving, pregnancy, preventing mother to child transmission and breastfeeding.

Available in English, French, Russian and Spanish

LIVING2008 Criminalisation Working Group Statement

Several countries have recently introduced laws to criminalise HIV transmission, or exposing another person to the virus. Prosecutions are increasing. A number of jurisdictions have used general laws against serious bodily harm in cases where someone is accused of knowingly transmitting HIV or willingly exposing others to HIV transmission. Subject to controversy, these measures are sparking debate and concern among policymakers, legal and public health professionals, international organizations and civil society, on whether criminal law is applicable in such cases and if such application is accomplishing or damaging public health goals such as Universal Access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. PLHIV see criminalisation as a violation of their fundamental human, sexual and reproductive rights.
The vast majority of PLHIV does not want to transmit HIV and are concerned about transmission. To penalize the person living with HIV where transmission occurs discriminates against the person that is positive, in favor of the person that is negative when in fact both parties share responsibility.

Available in English, French, Russian and Spanish