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A Guideline for the Involvement of People Living with HIV in the Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria’s Country Coordination Mechanism.

As the global networks of people living with HIV (GNP+, ICW and Y+ Global) we advocate for the rights of people living with HIV to improve their quality of life. We have seen the devastating impact COVID-19 has had on our communities and been frustrated by the inadequate responses of our governments and institutions. It doesn’t have to be like this. We know there is a better way.

This report looks at each of the three key pillars of universal health coverage (UHC) through the lens of our times. We look at the experiences of people living with HIV during the COVID-19 pandemic and consider what lessons can be drawn from their experiences to help bring about the realisation of health for all.

A survey by GNP+, ICW and Y+ Global found that networks of people living with HIV are using innovative ways to ensure their peers and their communities continue to have access to the critical services that they need. This report showcases their achievements.

59 networks of people living with HIV and community organisations from 37 countries took part in the survey throughout April and May 2020 and shared the challenges they are facing and the strategies they have put in place to support their communities.

This report highlights the key factors that facilitate retention in care for women living with HIV and calls for increased focus on rights and dignity in care. The report presents the findings of community-led research related to the viewpoints and experiences of women who were initiated on antiretroviral treatment during pregnancy or breastfeeding and explores their perspectives on factors that have enabled them to successfully adhere to their treatment and retain in care.

The research for this report was coordinated jointly by GNP+ and the International Community of Women living with HIV (ICW) in partnership with ICW Eastern Africa and ICW Malawi and the Network of Zambian People living with HIV/AIDS (NZP+). This research, carried out by and for women living with HIV was conducted in three countries, Malawi, Uganda and Zambia, all of which are early implementers of the lifelong ARV treatment program (Option B+). Focus group discussions were held with women living with HIV who utilized services along with key informant interviews with healthcare workers, government representatives, international NGOs and community groups.

The aim of this research project is to develop a set of best practices on how healthcare systems can retain women living with HIV into lifelong care now that pregnant women living with HIV are being offered lifelong treatment. The report outlines from their own perspectives what factors help women living with HIV adhere to lifelong treatment and care.

Three decades after the first case of HIV was found in Nepal, HIV has become one of the most devastating diseases the country has ever faced. To date it is estimated that 40,000 people are living with HIV and nearly 4,000 have died of HIV-related illnesses in Nepal. Throughout this time, people living with HIV and key affected populations, have experienced and witnessed many violations of their human rights. The project, ‘Human Rights Count for Key Populations Living with HIV (KPLHIV)’, aims to document these violations, to aid advocacy against them and to devise long-term solutions.

In Kenya, networks of key populations and people living with HIV decided to focus on human rights violations among female sex workers living with HIV. Interviews with 30 sex workers living with HIV in six counties – Nairobi, Mombasa, Kiambu, Machakos, Kisumu and Busia – brought to the surface the many human rights violations female sex workers living with HIV face while accessing healthcare services, and violations by law enforcement officers.

Based on real life examples of violations, the Kenyan networks defined recommendations to promote the right to healthcare and access to justice, and to reform laws and policies.

Findings and recommendations from studies led by people living with HIV

This report presents the findings of the PHDP survey in Malawi. It describes the experiences of PLHIV in the context of the national scale up of HIV testing, care and treatment with highlights of the important linkages between prevention, treatment, care, support and human rights. This can be used to inform evidence based PHDP programming. The findings of the study were analyzed in relation to the following PHDP components: empowerment, gender equality, health promotion and access, human rights, prevention of new infections, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and social and economic support.

The research was carried out by the Malawi Network of People Living with HIV (MANET+), with support from the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), conducted a cross-sectional survey among PLHIV to document their experiences in relation to Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention (PHDP) which promotes holistic health and wellness, including human rights, legal protections, policy environment free of stigma and discrimination for PLHIV as well as access to HIV treatment, care and support services and by doing so contributes to the health and wellbeing of their partners, families and communities.

 

 

This report examines the role of global-level advocacy in addressing HIV among key populations, including people living with HIV (PLHIV), people who inject drugs, sex workers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Entitled “Global Action with Local Impact: Why Advocacy Matters,” the report details strategies used and outcomes achieved by five constituency-led global network organizations focused on key populations, providing numerous case study examples illustrating the concrete impact of advocacy at the global level.

The report focuses on global-level work conducted as part of the Bridging the Gaps program, an international multi-agency effort devoted to achieving universal access to HIV services and ensuring full human rights for key populations. Supported by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the program is a collaboration between five Dutch-based organizations, five global key population networks, and 80 grassroots organizations across 16 countries.

The report includes principles of practice for global advocacy and a detailed theory of change depicting causal chains that lead to improvements in health and human rights for key populations. Numerous examples of global advocacy are included with a focus on concrete results of global advocacy initiatives. All work featured in the report was conducted by Bridging the Gaps global partners: the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International Network of People Who Use Drugs (INPUD), the Global Network of Sex Work Projects (NSWP), the MSMGF, and the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC).

More information on each of the other global key population networks featured in the report can be found on their respective websites: INPUD (www.inpud.net);  NSWP (www.nswp.org); the MSMGF (www.msmgf.org); and ITPC (www.itpcglobal.org). 

A new report released by the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the International Community of Women Living with HIV (ICW), and other local network partners, calls for dignity and rights in family planning programmes for women living with HIV in Cameroon, Nigeria and Zambia. that calls for discrimination-free family planning services for women living with HIV. The study examined the experiences of women living with HIV in accessing family planning services.

Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention. Findings and recommendations from a study led by and among people living with HIV in Swaziland 2012

At 26% Swaziland’s HIV prevalence is the highest among adults in the world (UNAIDS, 2010). An estimated 210,000 people of all ages are living with HIV in Swaziland. The increasing availability of HIV treatment has enabled people living with HIV (PLHIV) to live longer, healthier lives, and to engage in issues that directly impact on their lives and those of their partners, families and communities. In 2011, the Dutch Postcode Lottery funded a proposal submitted by STOP AIDS NOW! and the MaxART consortium, whose primary objective was to maximize access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Swaziland. The scale up in access to, and uptake of, HIV testing and treatment has set the stage for an implementation study to put into practice the exciting new evidence that HIV treatment can also serve as a means of prevention. One of the components of the project was the documentation of the needs and realities of PLHIV in Swaziland, in the context of the national scale-up of access to ART. This helped to continuously improve and develop evidence informed activities.

To this end, MaxART partner organization Swaziland National Network of People Living with HIV and AIDS (SWANNEPHA), with support from the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), conducted a cross-sectional survey among PLHIV to document their experiences in relation to Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention (PHDP) which promotes holistic health and wellness, including human rights, legal protections, policy environment free of stigma and discrimination for PLHIV as well as access to HIV treatment, care and support services and by doing so contributes to the health and wellbeing of their partners, families and communities. A total of 919 people were reached from the four regions of Swaziland with the support of expert clients who are also people living with HIV.

This report presents the findings of the PHDP survey and it describes the experiences of PLHIV in the context of the national scale up of HIV testing, care and treatment with highlights of the important linkages between prevention, treatment, care, support and human rights. This will go a long way to inform evidence based PHDP programming. The findings of the study were analyzed in relation to the following PHDP components: empowerment, gender equality, health promotion and access, human rights, prevention of new infections, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and social and economic support.

In mid-January 2015, women living with HIV came together with the World Health Organisation (WHO) to consult and give input to a global survey on sexual and reproductive health and human rights of women living with HIV. Dr Manjulaa Narasimhan of WHO’s Reproductive Health and Research Department led on conducting the survey, which will inform WHO as it updates its 2006 guidelines on this topic.

Summary Report of Proceedings: COUNTRY TO COUNTRY SHARING MEETING

13–14 December 2013, Nairobi, Kenya

The concept for the Framework for Dialogue was born in 2010 out of a mutually agreed desire for sustained and systematized action-oriented dialogue between faith communities/ religious leaders and networks of people living with HIV for the purpose of contributing to an effective response to HIV at country level.

The first (pilot) dialogue was held in Malawi in May 2012, with further pilots in Ethiopia and Myanmar. Following the pilots, Uganda held its first dialogue in December 2013. Kenya is one of the other countries planning to implement the process in 2014.

A summary report of the HIV Leadership through Accountability final project meeting held in Dakar, Senegal 3-5 June, 2013.

The side event “Post-2015 Development Framework…what’s in it for young people?” was held following the General Assembly 68th Session’s High Level Event on the MDGs and brought together representatives of UN Member States, UN agencies and civil society, as well as key politicians and young people living with and affected by HIV.  The aim was to facilitate an open and frank discussion with young people living with and affected by HIV and representatives of key population groups giving them a voice in the global post-2015 debate and to better understand the challenges they face in accessing comprehensive HIV and sexual and reproductive health services and their needs and hopes for the future.

The event was co-organized by the African Services Committee, the Global Youth Coalition on HIV/AIDS (GYCA), the HIV Young Leaders Fund , Housing Works,  ICASO, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), International Civil Society Support (ICSS), the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, the International Women’s Health Coalition and STOP AIDS NOW!.

This report reviews the combined findings and recommendations of research conducted by NEPHAK using five GNP+ evidence gathering tools, trying to answer the questions how we can create a Positive Health, Dignity and Prevention (PHDP) Framework for Kenya. It explores whether the evidence contained within the five reports to describe the country’s progress towards achieving the values of PHDP and to document the existence and performance of the programmatic components (policies, services and initiatives) are ready to be integrated into a national PHDP framework, and then highlights recommendations most likely to improve the health and dignity of PLHIV in Kenya.

A thematic review was performed of the findings, conclusions and recommendations to search for any significant reference to the key PHDP themes and issues, as described by the PHDP Policy Framework. Observations were made on any topic which was not addressed in the LTA research.

The report summarises the key findings of the review, and describes the key barriers and opportunities to advance PHDP as suggested by the thematic analysis and the action steps for PHDP advocacy that can be drawn from the LTA research recommendations.